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  • Understanding Attitudes Towards Mathematics (ATM) using a Multi-modal model: An Exploratory Case Study with Secondary School Children in England (28 comments)

    • Comment by Laura Oxley on June 18th, 2016

      I think it would be helpful for the reader if you explained earlier on and more explicitly why you have chosen students of ages 11 and 15 years old. From this paragraph I understand that it is because these students are at the beginning of their respective Key Stages, but it would be good to have this information earlier on as I was wondering why.

      Comment by Laura Oxley on June 18th, 2016

      This is really interesting but I would change the colours so that low attainment is red and high attainment is green. I know this is different to the other two factors (ESL and FSM) colour scheme, but I think it may be more intuitive to read as we tend to think of green as the most desirable outcomes (ie high attainment, low FSM, low ESL).

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      I know ATM is in the title, but normally one would expect this acronym to be spelled out when first introduced in the text

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      Nice layout of paper

       

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      I’d try to be consistent with use of quotation marks e.g., single or double quotes (above, single quotation marks are used, so would use this for ‘affect’ here)

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      I don’t think you need to spell out ATM here if you already do above

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      This is good to see the researcher has recgonised and thought about how to address the limitations of focus group interviews

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      ‘connotations’ in second to last sentence I think should be plural

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      Nice illustration (albeit an unfortunate experience for the pupil!)

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      Was there any methods employed to reduce the risk of Type I error using t-tests for multiple comparisons?

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      Great insight into girls’ attitudes and experiences of maths

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      It would be nice for the author to engage a bit more with the literature for reasons why he/she believes attitudes were not significantly different between age groups. In the literature on student engagement, general findings point to a decrease in school engagement over the school years. How might these findings speak to that literature?

      I can’t find at the moment the specific reference I had in mind, but some sources in this area on student engagement that might be helpful are:

      Christenson, S. L. A., Reschly, A. L., & Wylie, C. (Eds.). (2012). Handbook of research on student engagement. London, UK: Springer. Retrieved from https://www.dawsonera.com/abstract/9781461420187

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      Fredricks, J. A., Blumenfeld, P. C., & Paris, A. H. (2004). School engagement: Potential of the concept, state of the evidence. Review of Educational Research, 74(1), 59–109

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      Skinner, E. A., Kindermann, T. A., & Furrer, C. J. (2008). A motivational perspective on engagement and disaffection: Conceptualization and assessment of children’s behavioral and emotional participation in academic activities in the classroom. Educational and Psychological Measurement
      Skinner, E. A., Furrer, C., Marchand, G., & Kindermann, T. (2008). Engagement and disaffection in the classroom: Part of a larger motivational dynamic? Journal of Educational Psychology, 100(4), 765–781. 

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      Skinner, E. A., Kindermann, T. A., Connell, J. P., & Wellborn, J. G. (2009). Engagement and disaffection as organizational constructs in the dynamics of motivational development. In K. R. Wentzel, A. Wigfield, & D. Miele (Eds.), Handbook of motivation at school (pp. 223–245). Oxon, UK: Routledge. Retrieved from https://www.pdx.edu/sites/www.pdx.edu.psy/files/35_Wentzel_C011-Skinner.pdf

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      What about implications of the study? E.g., how might knowledge about ATM support teachers? In cases of low self-concept, possibly introducing pupils to the idea of a growth mindset (e.g., see Dweck 2008, 2012) might help reduce negative attitudes?

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      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      I agree with Megan, ATM should be spelled out in the abstract and the introduction, and then the acronym can be used in the rest of the paper.

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      Thank you very much for your comment and suggestions. The first phase of this study (focus groups) highlighted the differences in ATM between 11 year old and 15 year old students (please see paragraph 18 &  62). However, the quantitative data did not show any significant difference between the two cohorts. This can be due to different reasons which were not discussed in this paper due to limited word space.

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      :)

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      Thanks!

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      Thank you !

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      Thank you for your comment and drawing my attention towards this inconsistency.

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      Thank you for pointing it out. I will add a sentence in the introduction section to explain it, as you have suggested.

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      Thanks, I understand your point but I thought it would become confusing for the reader if the colour schemes were not consistent, therefore I drew it the way it is.

      Comment by Farhat on July 8th, 2016

      In this study independent samples were used for t-tests and tests for normality were also conducted to reduce the risk of type 1 error. Details of the quantitative data are going to be discussed in another paper.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      Because in this multiple case study, various types of data has been collected, triangulation of data could also be explained associated with mixed-method as already mentioned in the study.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      A very well written paper. Each part, including the abstract, literature review, results and discussion, is written in detail on the attitudes of students on Mathematics.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      You should remove this paragraph as in the original research articles IMRD (Introduction-Methodology-Results and Discussion) is a well-established convention, thus, readers are already familiar with. Maybe because the paper is an outcome of an MA thesis, the author put this paragraph.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      As for the first letter in each sub-title, there are some inconsistencies. For example, as for “1.2 Factors influencing ATM”, the second word “influence” started with lower case “i”. However, when we move on like “1.2.2 Gender and Age”, the first letter of each word has been capitalised. Consistency is needed.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on June 5th, 2017

      Very informative abstract and the theoretical framework was accompanied by a concise Figure. Please refer to Figure in the text (for example, under subsection 1.1. in the first paragraph).

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on June 5th, 2017

      Could you please justify why you considered “five factors”?

  • Torn Between Expectations and Imagination: Alternative Forms of Communicating Educational Research (25 comments)

    • Comment by miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      I personally like the abstract, as it has a kind of personal and more narrative approach. However, I found a bit repetitive the use of “WE”.

      I also consider that the word “Believe”… We believe, should be replaced by we argue, consider, etc…

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

       When you mention “in such a way”, it sounds to me a bit repetitive, I would take this out.  I also believe that this first introductory  paragraph is clear and includes most of the information I need to understand the rational for writing this paper.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      I feel the style of writing is going to take a really reflective, experiential and probable narrative approach. I would emphasize that fact in here. instead of mentioning  “This article is based on our original reflective paper, but in addition the four-month gap has allowed us to add another layer of reflection and further contemplate on the implications of the workshop.” I would say this article is based and adopts a reflective approach which complements the layer of reflections triggered in the workshop.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      This paragraph confused me a bit.. is this the context?  the title is not helping me to understand the main idea of it.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      This is clear and concise. it provides information about Arts-based methodologies ( that I wasn’t aware of) in a short and straightforward way.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      I really liked this paragraph as it provides clear examples of what you are aiming in this paper. You can think about  including some of this in the abstract.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      I liked this account which relates to the research made by practitioners. However, I consider that you need to include some comments regarding the implications of practitioner research in the research process itself. Give some examples, for example, teacher doing action research,etc.. just to give a better understanding of the concept.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      “These modes of dissemination may be ” instead of repeating this sentence… you can say ” for instance….

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      clear! However, the brackets make me stop the reading. Maybe it is just me!

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

       I would say…. Yanyue brought a bag  of everyday and curious objects to the workshop which included a beach shell, necklace…

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      I would include the detail of the 15 participants in the abstract.

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      a bit descriptive section here, which is fine! However, I would try to input a bit of reflective writing in here, or a more critical reflective perspective. mainly explain WHY the participants found it challenging to identify a particular way of including everybody’s research? Was it because the instruction was not clear? was it because the activity itself required more time ? was it because the topics were so diverse that you didn’t forecast that to happen?…. you also mentioned this was solved… HOW? you gave more time, you acted as facilitators, there was a discussion ?

      Comment by Miguel Angel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      Good! you are giving reasons in this paragraph.

      Comment by Miguel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      this tile is a bit confusing to me. are this concluding reflections after the workshop? was this like a section in the workshop? if so just take the title out, as it doesn’t add much as a new section.

      Comment by Miguel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      Donald Schön is a He. I think that the point you are making in here is that you reflected in and on action to write the following reflections. In that case, I would mention that reflection is an ongoing process and as such it has been affected and changed over the time. You can also include that learning is a continuous an as such this paper adopts that premise.

      Comment by Miguel Cerna Caceres on June 1st, 2016

      I really liked your reflections! as a general comment, I would try to make a better link with reflection as a process of writing. It is really interesting to read something that describes an experience, and mix academic writing and personal experiences. I believe we need a bit more of this in academia. Thanks!

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

       

      Thank you very much for your submission to CORERJ. Below are some suggestions for your consideration.  

       

      Abstract: The focus of the paper “communicating educational research” as a reflection is an interesting contribution to the relevant literature.   1- In the  abstract rather than providing the structure of the paper, (such as in line 3 We start with an overview or in line 4, We then) please briefly describe the study with key aspects between 250 to 300 words.  

       

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

       

      Introduction: Paragraph 16-Could you explain the reason the underlying reason and you motivation  why the workshop had 3 parts.

       

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      How did you deal with the a number of participants’ challenges for that you wrote “Once this has been sorted”.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      In paragraph 78, after your final sentence starting with “We belive…” you may suggest future research on the same topic for the sustainability.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      Your sentence on needs for audience and participant is a significant dimension, thus, a few sentences can be added from the relevant literature with references how collaboration among stakeholder to define needs can increase active participation and also motivation.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      The number of the participants in the workshop should be included after the first sentence as (n=15).

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      The photos indeed helped the workshop context to visualise.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      You should provide references on why “we often need to avoid complex language” and “Alternetive forms of publication and dissemination often require collaboration”.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      “Learning by doing” is one of the highlights in education. You may give a reference for interested reader to learn about the topic.

  • Can humour help the Early Years supply teacher in developing positive relationships with staff and pupils? (24 comments)

    • Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      In the last sentence, you write about two different results, separated by “however”. This suggests that the two results are in some way not aligned with each other. For me it is not apparent why they should not be aligned, and thus wonder whether this is a matter of word choice or whether the difference between the results is not explicit enough.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      I would say that the information about the participating schools (location and cultural background of pupils) should be part of the methodology rather than introduction.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      There appears to be a percentage missing in line 5: “between and 5-10%”.

      I would consider to have this paragraph as the first paragraph of the introduction as it emphasises the importance of examining issues surrounding supply teachers.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      I suggest that you combine this paragraph with the following one as they are both about building relationships and your personal experience. Otherwise the paragraph seems rather incomplete.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Here it sounds a little bit as though you conducted the study merely for your own benefit, that is for you to understand how you use humour. I am sure that this study can contribute in more important ways (e.g., to the literature in general and to guide supply teachers), which may be important to emphasise.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Are these your research questions? If so, they should probably go at the end of your literature review rather than here.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      The literature review is usually part of the introduction, so I don’t think you need a separate header here.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      When you write about a “direct correlation”, do you refer to statistical correlation? If not, I would use the term “relationship” instead because it’s a little confusing otherwise.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Maybe you can describe more detailed what you mean by a style of humour that is part of one’s ‘larger-than-life personality’ or that is ‘self-enhancing’.  This is not entirely clear to me.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      I understand that children most enjoy “empowerment” humour, but i wonder if this justifies the argument that teachers should use this kind of humour. My concern would be that you already discussed that a major issue is that children tend to disrespect supply teachers and to misbehave in their classes because of a lack of relationship, so that using a kind of humour that is based on ‘disobedience’ and ‘mocking’ may even add to this. I’m no expert in this area at all, but would expect that this kind of humour may only work effectively when a good and respectful relationship has already been established.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Just a general comment for the review section. It may be useful if you try to connect the different sub-sections a bit better. Now you simply separate different ideas by the headings but they seem rather unconnected. The overall flow of the paper would be better if there would be a connection between the different parts.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      I would first clearly lay out the research questions without referring to the method yet. Also, above you had several questions, so is this the only one you try to answer?

       

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Just a tiny remark but you suddenly switch from lower case sub-headings to upper-case ones.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      For me it would be helpful if you would first explain what you are actually planning to do, ie. how you will collect your data, and then afterwards justify your choice. Otherwise you describe a perspective that I cannot yet link to your study.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Especially because informed consent is such an important issue, I wonder why you did not approach the children’s parents in addition to the head teacher? If you would only focus on the teachers it may be ok, but if I understood correctly, you will also note children’s reactions to humour. I would also say that teachers should have been able to give consent for themselves rather than letting the head teacher decide for them.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      It is not entirely clear what these different types of humour mean. Maybe you could describe them. Did you develop these labels or do they come from the literature?

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Is “Mr Werth” a pseudonym? If not, I think you should use one.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      I only realise now, that this is probably you (the author), sorry about that.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      You mention Table 4 in the appendices, but there appears to be no Appendix in this paper.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      What do you mean by ‘mature themes’? I think this needs clarification.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      Overall in this section, I miss a more detailed analysis of pupil-teacher and teacher-teacher relationships. Your main question and conclusion involves the relationship between humour and relationship building, but you never really discuss what you mean by a positive relationship.

      Comment by Pia Kreijkes on August 12th, 2017

      I’m not sure that your findings justify to speak of “powerfully positive effects”. You spoke relatively little about the actual relationships between pupils and teachers but rather about pupils’ reactions to humour. Thus, I would formulate this more tentatively.

      Comment by Hogai Aryoubi on August 14th, 2017

      Humour is often considered key in developing relationships (Dean & Major, 2008; Romero & Cruthirds, 2006).

      Comment by Hogai Aryoubi on August 14th, 2017

      It has been suggested that pupils, as well as teachers, often do not respect supply teachers as proper teachers (Cornwall, 2005). 

  • A Systematic Application of Dual-Process Theory To Mathematics Education (21 comments)

    • Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      Nice overview the review

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      It’s helpful for acronyms, such as STEM to be spelled out to readers not familiar with the terminology.

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      Agree. I also think people recognise the importance of collaboration. It’s the practical issue of how to do this. It is probably beyond the scope of your paper, but I think beginning to consider strategies to do this (e.g., setting up a cross-discipline journals, conferences, organisations are some possibilities).

       

      Comment by Megan on June 23rd, 2016

      This is a nice ending, showing critical thinking of the literature and consideration of ways to move this research area forward.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      Good abstract, perhaps instead of saying grades 10th and 12th (since that might mean different in different contexts) you could mention the age group of the students, or perhaps the year group considering most readers would understand the UK system.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      Good justification for the work that you have done in this paper.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      This is useful, if you could add perhaps a sentence or two about ‘how’ you adapted the two tables, then it would be further useful for the reader.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      This is great, especially since it will help you further justify the lack of collaboration with other disciplines like mathematics education, where there might be more varied methodological approaches.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      Good analysis. There is no need to refer Crowley twice. Since you have mentioned that you  are using that reference, the rest of the work could be discussed based on that.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      This is a very good analysis.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      Perhaps you could add a sentence about how this one-to-one correspondence in processes might be more complex, considering conceptual knowledge is often also seen as a more reflective aspect of mathematics learning, as compared to procedural knowledge (proc knowledge, some argue can be obtained by massed practice of routine mathematical problems without engaging with the underlying mathematical structures). You could perhaps suggest further research in what these mathematics educational categories could mean in terms of cognitive processes, since your paper suggests a deeper and a more sophisticated dialogue between the two disciplines.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      This is also very helpful for the reader to get more evidence of the kind of collaborations that do exist.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      This is important, since it is important to justify why these papers were chosen. If you could just add something about what kind of literature you were looking at while choosing the papers for the review would be  helpful, since it will further give the reader some ideas about how you went about choosing these.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      Once again, it might be useful to know which literature you were looking at.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      This is really helpful since how I see this paper is like an invitation for the two disciplines to collaborate, and it is crucial for you to say that this is an attempt and there is need for more critical engagement of the two fields.

      Comment by Meghna on June 29th, 2016

      I agree with Megan, this is a nice ending.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      The review is written to fill the gap and expressed clearly in the abstract: “This review seeks to bridge this troubling gap between educational research and cognitive psychology…”

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      The highlight about “collaboration between dual-process theorists and mathematics education researchers ” is a good deduction for educational research. 

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      You may remove the first sentence to make the paper more concise and to focus on the following sentence “My analysis has revealed…”.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      A very good guidance for the audience who are interested in “correlations”.

      Comment by Huseyin OZDEMIR on July 16th, 2016

      Because referencing style in CORERJ is APA, the whole text should be checked in line with the APA referencing style to prevent the inconsistencies. Eg., while providing reference in parenthesis, sometimes “&” has been used but sometimes “and” has been used while the publication is co-authored. 

  • Negotiating the Incorporation of Multimodal Materials in Literacy Learning: Some Observations in One Secondary School in Uganda (16 comments)

    • Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      I don’t see the need to mention that in the abstract, or perhaps in less detail, for instance removing the title of the thesis.

       

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Not sure if I agree that multimodality is a type of communication. Multimodality is the phenomenon that communication is almost always multimodal, and it involves “modes”, not medium, which would then refer to multimediality.

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      [, the class was large with approximately 130 learners. ]: this information is repeated.

       

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Does it mean that there were limitations to a reader-centred approach? Is this why you mention it? Can it be more explicit?

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Again repetition of the number. Is it necessary?

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Consider revising the subtitle? Its construction does not seem very clear.

       

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Consider revising the subtitle? Its construction does not seem very clear.

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Only physical traits? Is it possible to specify? When they are transformed in pictures, it seems to be a focus on their appearance. How was their personality considered?

       

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      [settings both in urban and rural settings]

      Setting repeated 2 times in the same sentence. Perhaps consider another word?

       

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Benefit and challenges of what? Expand the subtitle? Perhaps “of using multimodal methods in the teaching of literature”?

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Even with these comments from the readers, wouldn’t the materials still fulfill their purpose as a tool to trigger students engagement with and analysis of the novel?

       

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      [drama, group discussions and role play]

      Aren’t drama and role paly also multimodal strategies? I think they would qualify as such.

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      This does not show much confidence. From what was described above, although there we limitations and difficulties, the approaches seem extremely successful. Can you link with what was said earlier and conclude with a mode assertive position on the value of such teaching techniques and tools?

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Extra line space

      Comment by Aline Frederico on July 4th, 2016

      Was the aim to enhance the data or to be a good teaching technique that fostered student-centered learning?

      Comment by Rebecca Nambi on July 14th, 2016

      The aim was to enhance the process of data collection and to enrich the data

  • Marginalisation and the Voices of Gypsy/Traveller Girls (15 comments)

    • Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 9th, 2015

      A classic.  Just wanted to add that this piece is in “Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture”, edited by Nelson and Grossberg.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 9th, 2015

      I think this reference needs a place (i.e., New York) for Teachers College Press.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 9th, 2015

      This reference may also needs a place (i.e., Edinburgh, I think) for Scottish Travellers Consortium.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 9th, 2015

      This is great information.  I think the first sentence could be simplified – perhaps you could start the paragraph with a noun (i.e., Gypsy/Traveller girls) to be direct, and then you may specify each “their” point.  This may also unpack the key points you make.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      This is fascinating, and well written in one paragraph.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      These details are very useful.  Quick note: in the third sentence, I wonder if there should be a semicolon or a period after “The term is capitalised”.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      Great justification.  Since you’re leaning towards qualitative, I think you could also point to the idea of offering “thick descriptions” and deep understandings – for those interested in learning more about contemporary Gypsy/Traveller communities.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      Useful.  I wonder if you may be able to expand on that penultimate sentence of “until I gathered enough interviews”: how did you decide?  Was it because of some sort of data saturation?  Was it because you had limited time/resource?  Or something else?

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      Good overview.  I wonder if you may also touch on informed consent for participants.  Also, it may be useful to note if you  reflected on ethical guidelines set up in Scotland (i.e., if written) and/or ethical frameworks set up by educational committees.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      Wow, this gets into some rich data.

      I think in the introduction you said you’re still deciding on a conceptual framework – that’s good.  Once that’s set up, I believe it would be useful for the reader to get an explicit sense of the analysis method(s).  For instance, as of now, it looks like some type of inductive approach in which you’re coding and categorising the data to come up with themes/fragments.  You may describe this further.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      It looks like there’s a typo in the sixth sentence after “and that”; the comma is floating.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      Great way to connect the findings.  Just a quick point on the non-capitalised typo with “bell hooks (1981)”.  Also, check out the reference, I think the name also needs to be capitalised there.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      Apologies!  Please forget that last comment – I lacked knowledge that Ms. hooks writes her name like that.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on April 11th, 2015

      This is a very well written and important piece of work.  As I read this, I made notes on the analysis and ethical considerations for the study.  I also wrote small points on typos.  A great paper.

      Comment by Geetha Marcus on April 14th, 2015

      Thank you for taking the time to read my work and for your valuable comments. I shall take what you have said on board in editing this paper, and some of your suggestions are already in my thesis. You are right that this research is an inductive piece, an emic approach. The study is also based on an interpretive qualitative research epistemology, which  includes a critical paradigm, becauuse of the issues of power and inequalities that emerge from the findings. Thanks once again, Hardeek.

  • Competing Paradigms for Basic Education: Human Capital and Human Capabilities and What They Mean for the World Bank and UNESCO (11 comments)

    • Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This is a concise and well-written paper, which analyses the issue of basic education and its first principles.  You also draw on key references, which is useful for readers who’d like to review arguments carefully.  If you have the time, I’d also recommend texts from Professors David Labaree, Richard Murnane, and Fernando Reimers, who give thoughtful takes on educational development from a historical, economic, and global perspective, respectively.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This is a helpful reminder for readers.  Also, politics influence a society’s educational policies.  If interested, Robert Cowen makes a strong argument in citing the role of politics on policies and comparative education.  Reference: Cowen, R.  (2014).  Ways of knowing, outcomes and ‘comparative education’: be careful what you pray for.  Comparative Education, 50(3), 282-301.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This is a good description.  I also wonder about the word ‘relevance’, as you write in the topic sentence of the next paragraph.  Is there a way to describe the term ‘relevance’ here, initially, so that the reader is prepared when they move onto the next paragraph?

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      To avoid assumptions for readers, it may be simpler to write out what “this” refers to.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This might be a typo; if so, Merriam, 2009 should be second and Tatto, 2012 should be third.  Also, please double-check the multi-referenced citations for the rest of this paper.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This is useful.  Do you also have statistics on the initial search results and the final sample of documents for literature review?  Also, what was the specific time frame – it looks like the start date was post-1990; what was the end date?

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      Small typo: Woessman.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      Readers may benefit if you cite the reference(s) about the published post-2015 goals.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This might be a typo; if so, is this the reference citation?

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This looks like a typo; the page numbers should be added.

      Comment by Hardeek H. Shah on August 10th, 2017

      This looks like a typo: should there be more words at the end of this reference citation, and a period?

  • Research Note: Glocalization as it Affects East African Female Youth Transitioning out of a Catholic Boarding School in Uganda (9 comments)

    • Comment by Charleen on June 26th, 2016

      Clear, strong conceptualization of the problem. A small question on why the phrase ‘Literary Concerns’ in the title of this sub-section?

      Comment by Charleen on June 26th, 2016

      This is a really interesting, open-ended question to explore.

      Comment by Charleen on June 26th, 2016

      Not quite sure I understand this sub-question – ‘factor’ in terms of…? I also wonder if perhaps the term ‘factor’ conjures up quantitative connotations and is better substituted with another term that suits the qualitative paradigm of the researcher?

      Comment by Charleen on June 26th, 2016

      A very good justification for this study! Regarding the penultimate sentence, is this a study of “glocalization as it affects East African young women”, or is it a study of how young women experience glocalization? (My impression was that it was more the latter). A subtle difference, but a difference which I feel demonstrates differing emphases. Also, some critics might say that ‘glocalization’ doesn’t affect anyone;  it is only an analytic term. Rather, transnational, national and subnational agents/players are those that affect young women, not ‘glocalization’ per se. On the whole, a really readable and strong research note; I enjoyed reading it.

      Comment by Charleen on June 26th, 2016

      I think there is a small typo at the start of the final sentence – “My aim is to understand of how to promote social justice,….”

      Comment by Jacqueline Gallo on June 30th, 2016

      Thank you Charleen for your comment.  I meant to note that there is limited empirical work in the literature related to contemporary missionary education studies in East Africa.  Rephrasing will help clarify.  thank you.

      Comment by Ankit Vyas on February 13th, 2017

      Are these girls isolated in a geographic sense as well? I understand that they are being taught by Americans but are all the staff members of the orphanage American? Also, are there limited interactions with the “real worl” beyond the orphanage?

      Comment by Ankit Vyas on February 13th, 2017

      This methodology appears quite comprehensive in terms of the data it will make available and representativeness of different stakeholders.

      Comment by Ankit Vyas on February 13th, 2017

      If the education being received is not considerate of local context, would talking about decolonisation theories (especially curriculum) be useful at some point?

  • Transitions, Truth-Telling and Teaching History (9 comments)

    • Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      The “field of transitional justice” isn’t human being, and it thus cannot “(attempt) to theorise and carry out different conceptions of justice…” Sounds like an anthropomorphising of an un-human thing. Instead consider: “Scholars in the field of transitional justice…” / “Transitional justice scholars”. Also consider replacing “carry out” with “outline” different conceptions. It’s a bit unclear to me what “carrying out” a conception looks like.

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      “oversight” means a mistake made in failing to recognise something. Is this the correct word used here? It’s not clear to me how research can “act as a valuable vehicle for the oversight of…power”. Do you mean for the ‘overseeing of power’? Overseeing and oversight mean two different things

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      Perhaps use a clearer term than “core addition”? Can something be both “core” and an “addition”?

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      Perhaps use a clearer term than “core addition”. Can something be both “core” and an “addition”? Seems like a contradiction in terms?

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      Seems like a typo here – I believe it should be “canon” rather than “cannon”. It would be good to go through the document and change the word “cannon” to “canon”

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      Please ignore if I’m making a mistake, but I was wondering why there is a ‘242’ here – is the reference correct? Would be great to double-check.

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      Thank you for a helpful overview of the different types of justice!

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      There should be a comma after 1990s

      Comment by CNC on August 17th, 2017

      Overall, a helpful and well-written article that illustrates a beneficial connection between transitional justice and history teaching. The abstract can be made a little less complex and shortened, and emphasise more the implications for history educators (as the CORERJ readership will likely be most interested in that).

  • Research Note: Examining Services Available to Greek Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) (7 comments)

    • Comment by Sarah Hardstaff on July 14th, 2016

      I’m fascinated by the phrase “families’ social problems become privatised”, as this seems to encapsulate the social impact of austerity. You may not have space to explore it further here, but it would be interesting to hear about some examples of this phenomenon.

      Comment by Sarah Hardstaff on July 14th, 2016

      Perhaps it’s worth pointing out for the non-specialist reader that such a high proportion of boys is not that unusual for a sample of people with autism.

      In your wider project, have you observed interesting and/or significant differences in the responses from parents of boys versus parents with girls?

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      A very well structured and informative abstract.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      Keywords for the abstract should be added.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      After reviewing the literature, you may Express the contribution of your study to the available literature and if any niche is filled.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      You should explain why purposive sampling strategy was used given that selection of the study informants is one of the significant issues for the credibility of the research.

      Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      You should write about the limitation of the study, such as limited number of participants and only using survey data, for tentative conclusions.

  • Understanding Special School Provision for Children with Severe Learning Difficulties in Relation to Inclusive Education (6 comments)

    • Comment by Maria Tsapali on April 3rd, 2015

      I think that the abstract could be shortened a bit. It does not to be so detailed.

      Comment by Maria Tsapali on April 3rd, 2015

      The rationale for the study is really clear and strong. The literature review is thorough and demonstrates and appropriate coverage of the subject.

      Comment by Maria Tsapali on April 3rd, 2015

      As the methodology used in this study is a case study of a school, maybe more details about the school and how it was chosen or why it is appropriate could be provided.

      Comment by Maria Tsapali on April 3rd, 2015

      The choice and the diversity of the participants is really useful as it enables the researcher to examine the issue from all aspects. Very nice idea.

      Comment by Maria Tsapali on April 3rd, 2015

      Very good job acknowledging the limitations and restrictions of the study.

      Comment by Maria Tsapali on April 3rd, 2015

      In the abstract it is stated that the methodology adopted was a case study, However, there is no mention at case study research and why it was chosen at the method section.  I think more information about the reasons why case study is appropriate for this study could be included. Overall, it is a very well structured and coherent paper on a controversial topic. I read it with great interest.

  • “I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free”: Developing Aesthetic Literacy in Visual Culture Studies (5 comments)

    • Comment by S Nath on August 14th, 2017

      [The main objective of this study is based on a thesis written in fulfilment of the University of Cambridge’s MPhil Education course requirements) was to provide theoretical insight into the teaching of visual culture studies in South Africa, with a specific focus on a visual analysis lesson. ]

      This sentence should probably be restructured to say ” The aim of the study is to provide theoretical insight into the teaching of visual culture studies in South Africa, with a specific focus on a visual analysis lesson  (This study is based on a thesis written in fulfillment of the University of Cambridge’s MPhil Education course requirements).

      Comment by S Nath on August 14th, 2017

      [This study fers a visual analysis planning framework and lesson plan for FET art educators that will guide them in shaping students’ aesthetic literacy through the development of content knowledge, and the engagement of the imagination and feelings.]

      The abstract should not have any grammatical or spelling mistakes. “This study offers”

      You should include a line about your findings/conclusions/impressions of this study in the abstract

      Comment by S Nath on August 14th, 2017

      Good introduction.

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Comment by S Nath on August 14th, 2017

      [It is for this reason that art educators should be able to engage adolescent students and present new knowledge in a way that appeals to them, to interpret artworks.]

      Are there any other studies that talk about the importance of familiarity and contextual relevance for students interpreting artworks depicting foreign elements? It would help bolster your own observations.

      Comment by S Nath on August 14th, 2017

      [ofctual]

      of actual

  • Understanding Second Language Learning Through a Sociolinguistic Lens: A Comparative Analysis of the Variationist and Identity Approaches (3 comments)

    • Comment by meghna on August 18th, 2017

      It is great that you are explicitly discussing the aim of the article at this stage.

      Comment by meghna on August 18th, 2017

      This is really good critique.

      Comment by meghna on August 18th, 2017

      This is a very well-written article. You have integrated literature on L2 learning and your comparison of the the two papers really well. Instead of a more typical comparison framework (literature, theoretical framework, methodology), the idea of choosing themes like ‘views of identity’ and ‘learner agency’ work very well. Making this very engaging.

  • Research Note: Alternative Approaches to Behaviour Management in Schools: An Exploration of Senior School Leaders’ Experiences, Beliefs and Perceptions of Interventionist Behaviour Management Systems (2 comments)

    • Comment by Neslihan O. OZDEMIR on July 15th, 2016

      You may provide the definition for “challenging behaviour” with a reference.

      Comment by Ankit Vyas on February 13th, 2017

      Why are only head teachers being interviewed online? Is it because they are the ones responsible for behaviour management in their schools?

  • How Does Sociolinguistic Theory Contribute to Insights About Second Language Learning: A Comparative Analysis of Two Empirical Studies (1 comment)

    • Comment by meghna on June 30th, 2017

      Test comment

Source: http://corerj.soc.srcf.net/?page_id=6